Indigenous st바카라사이트ations merger could see $100 million worth of mining operations transferred to the state

CAMPBELL: Labor has pledged to move the Queensland mining boom from the south and south-east to the state capital, which would see more than $100 million worth of mining operations t우리카지노ransferred from its mines to the state capital.

"Queensland's contribution to the national economy cannot continue to be ignored by the government - it must be addressed. "Queensland cannot continue to be left out of a global investment push," Labor's environment spokesman and mining spokesperson, Grant Robertson, said.

"A mining boom in Queensland will not be successful without investment and investment must be delivered to the north-east of the state, which is where many of our industries depend most for employment, skills and growth."

Robertson said in an article in the Melbourne Morning Herald that if the mining boom in the south-east was stopped it could see $110 million worth of mining investments moved from the state capital south to Lismore, an investment he said would "bring jobs and investment into our north-east and give us more tax revenue to build바카라 schools, roads and hospitals".

But the industry's chief executive, the Victorian branch president, the regional chief executive and two staff from the National Council of Mining Employees, have all rejected those claims, saying the company's operations were also being made in Lismore.

"We were never sold that these mines could not happen anywhere else in the state and we are totally unaware of any attempt to relocate operations of our mine operations to Lismore at any time in the last 20 years, nor will we attempt to do so," the regional branch president said in a statement on Monday.

"That has been proven on the ground that these operations are not feasible in the current circumstances.

"We will not continue with these operations or relocate them for the foreseeable future."

But the state branch president, the Victorian branch president, and two staff from the National Council of Mining Employees have rejected those claims, saying the company's operations were also being made in Lismore.

The president of the South West Regional Mining Group said his company was considering transferring its operations to Lismore and the chairman said an open letter sent to them from his employees in Lismore earlier this year revealed that most workers had concerns about leaving the city, but that most would find the move to Lismore rewarding.

"This is not the kind of investment you would want t